Traditional recipes

Renato Bialetti Dies, Ashes Placed in Coffee Pot He Made Famous

Renato Bialetti Dies, Ashes Placed in Coffee Pot He Made Famous

Over 300 million Bialetti Moka pots have been sold around the world

All Bialetti Moka pots bear a caricature of Renato Bialetti.

Italian coffee king Renato Bialetti passed away at the age of 93 last Thursday, and there couldn’t have been a more fitting final resting place.

Bialetti was cremated and his ashes were placed in none other than a replica of the stovetop espresso maker he made famous.

The decision was made by Bialetti’s children, Alessandra, Antonello, and Alfonso, who took the pot to his hometown of Casale Corte Cerro to be blessed by a priest during a funeral service, The Daily Mail reports.

Though Bialetti did not invent the Moka coffee pot, he is credited with making the pots and the family name famous. It was Bialetti’s father, Alfonso, who patented the pot in 1933, according to The Local. When Bialetti took over the company in 1947, only 70,000 pots had been manufactured. Today, over 300 million Bialetti Moka pots have been sold around the world, and Bialetti is a household name.

The L'omino con i baffi, or the little man with the moustache, which appears on all Bialetti Moka pots, is a caricature of Renato Bialetti.


Ashes of Italian ‘coffee king’ put in giant espresso pot

Renato Bialetti, the coffee king whose name is synonymous with the iconic aluminum stovetop esspresso makers, died last week at the age of 93.

In an unusual and strangely befitting tribute, the ashes of this well-known Italian coffee impresario were placed in a giant Moka pot at his funeral this week in Montebuglio, Italy.

Bialetti didn’t invent the Moka. He just made it famous. A man named Luigi di Ponti designed the appliance in 1933 and sold the patent to Renato’s father Alfonso Bialetti, an aluminum vendor.

Bialetti took the modest sales of his father’s company, which had only manufactured 70,000 pots when he gained control in 1947, and spearheaded a massive marketing campaign across Italy for the pots, which were branded with a mustachioed caricature.

L’omino con i baffi, the little man with a mustache, remains a widely-recognized symbol in Italy today.


Ashes of Italian ‘coffee king’ put in giant espresso pot

Renato Bialetti, the coffee king whose name is synonymous with the iconic aluminum stovetop esspresso makers, died last week at the age of 93.

In an unusual and strangely befitting tribute, the ashes of this well-known Italian coffee impresario were placed in a giant Moka pot at his funeral this week in Montebuglio, Italy.

Bialetti didn’t invent the Moka. He just made it famous. A man named Luigi di Ponti designed the appliance in 1933 and sold the patent to Renato’s father Alfonso Bialetti, an aluminum vendor.

Bialetti took the modest sales of his father’s company, which had only manufactured 70,000 pots when he gained control in 1947, and spearheaded a massive marketing campaign across Italy for the pots, which were branded with a mustachioed caricature.

L’omino con i baffi, the little man with a mustache, remains a widely-recognized symbol in Italy today.


Ashes of Italian ‘coffee king’ put in giant espresso pot

Renato Bialetti, the coffee king whose name is synonymous with the iconic aluminum stovetop esspresso makers, died last week at the age of 93.

In an unusual and strangely befitting tribute, the ashes of this well-known Italian coffee impresario were placed in a giant Moka pot at his funeral this week in Montebuglio, Italy.

Bialetti didn’t invent the Moka. He just made it famous. A man named Luigi di Ponti designed the appliance in 1933 and sold the patent to Renato’s father Alfonso Bialetti, an aluminum vendor.

Bialetti took the modest sales of his father’s company, which had only manufactured 70,000 pots when he gained control in 1947, and spearheaded a massive marketing campaign across Italy for the pots, which were branded with a mustachioed caricature.

L’omino con i baffi, the little man with a mustache, remains a widely-recognized symbol in Italy today.


Ashes of Italian ‘coffee king’ put in giant espresso pot

Renato Bialetti, the coffee king whose name is synonymous with the iconic aluminum stovetop esspresso makers, died last week at the age of 93.

In an unusual and strangely befitting tribute, the ashes of this well-known Italian coffee impresario were placed in a giant Moka pot at his funeral this week in Montebuglio, Italy.

Bialetti didn’t invent the Moka. He just made it famous. A man named Luigi di Ponti designed the appliance in 1933 and sold the patent to Renato’s father Alfonso Bialetti, an aluminum vendor.

Bialetti took the modest sales of his father’s company, which had only manufactured 70,000 pots when he gained control in 1947, and spearheaded a massive marketing campaign across Italy for the pots, which were branded with a mustachioed caricature.

L’omino con i baffi, the little man with a mustache, remains a widely-recognized symbol in Italy today.


Ashes of Italian ‘coffee king’ put in giant espresso pot

Renato Bialetti, the coffee king whose name is synonymous with the iconic aluminum stovetop esspresso makers, died last week at the age of 93.

In an unusual and strangely befitting tribute, the ashes of this well-known Italian coffee impresario were placed in a giant Moka pot at his funeral this week in Montebuglio, Italy.

Bialetti didn’t invent the Moka. He just made it famous. A man named Luigi di Ponti designed the appliance in 1933 and sold the patent to Renato’s father Alfonso Bialetti, an aluminum vendor.

Bialetti took the modest sales of his father’s company, which had only manufactured 70,000 pots when he gained control in 1947, and spearheaded a massive marketing campaign across Italy for the pots, which were branded with a mustachioed caricature.

L’omino con i baffi, the little man with a mustache, remains a widely-recognized symbol in Italy today.


Ashes of Italian ‘coffee king’ put in giant espresso pot

Renato Bialetti, the coffee king whose name is synonymous with the iconic aluminum stovetop esspresso makers, died last week at the age of 93.

In an unusual and strangely befitting tribute, the ashes of this well-known Italian coffee impresario were placed in a giant Moka pot at his funeral this week in Montebuglio, Italy.

Bialetti didn’t invent the Moka. He just made it famous. A man named Luigi di Ponti designed the appliance in 1933 and sold the patent to Renato’s father Alfonso Bialetti, an aluminum vendor.

Bialetti took the modest sales of his father’s company, which had only manufactured 70,000 pots when he gained control in 1947, and spearheaded a massive marketing campaign across Italy for the pots, which were branded with a mustachioed caricature.

L’omino con i baffi, the little man with a mustache, remains a widely-recognized symbol in Italy today.


Ashes of Italian ‘coffee king’ put in giant espresso pot

Renato Bialetti, the coffee king whose name is synonymous with the iconic aluminum stovetop esspresso makers, died last week at the age of 93.

In an unusual and strangely befitting tribute, the ashes of this well-known Italian coffee impresario were placed in a giant Moka pot at his funeral this week in Montebuglio, Italy.

Bialetti didn’t invent the Moka. He just made it famous. A man named Luigi di Ponti designed the appliance in 1933 and sold the patent to Renato’s father Alfonso Bialetti, an aluminum vendor.

Bialetti took the modest sales of his father’s company, which had only manufactured 70,000 pots when he gained control in 1947, and spearheaded a massive marketing campaign across Italy for the pots, which were branded with a mustachioed caricature.

L’omino con i baffi, the little man with a mustache, remains a widely-recognized symbol in Italy today.


Ashes of Italian ‘coffee king’ put in giant espresso pot

Renato Bialetti, the coffee king whose name is synonymous with the iconic aluminum stovetop esspresso makers, died last week at the age of 93.

In an unusual and strangely befitting tribute, the ashes of this well-known Italian coffee impresario were placed in a giant Moka pot at his funeral this week in Montebuglio, Italy.

Bialetti didn’t invent the Moka. He just made it famous. A man named Luigi di Ponti designed the appliance in 1933 and sold the patent to Renato’s father Alfonso Bialetti, an aluminum vendor.

Bialetti took the modest sales of his father’s company, which had only manufactured 70,000 pots when he gained control in 1947, and spearheaded a massive marketing campaign across Italy for the pots, which were branded with a mustachioed caricature.

L’omino con i baffi, the little man with a mustache, remains a widely-recognized symbol in Italy today.


Ashes of Italian ‘coffee king’ put in giant espresso pot

Renato Bialetti, the coffee king whose name is synonymous with the iconic aluminum stovetop esspresso makers, died last week at the age of 93.

In an unusual and strangely befitting tribute, the ashes of this well-known Italian coffee impresario were placed in a giant Moka pot at his funeral this week in Montebuglio, Italy.

Bialetti didn’t invent the Moka. He just made it famous. A man named Luigi di Ponti designed the appliance in 1933 and sold the patent to Renato’s father Alfonso Bialetti, an aluminum vendor.

Bialetti took the modest sales of his father’s company, which had only manufactured 70,000 pots when he gained control in 1947, and spearheaded a massive marketing campaign across Italy for the pots, which were branded with a mustachioed caricature.

L’omino con i baffi, the little man with a mustache, remains a widely-recognized symbol in Italy today.


Ashes of Italian ‘coffee king’ put in giant espresso pot

Renato Bialetti, the coffee king whose name is synonymous with the iconic aluminum stovetop esspresso makers, died last week at the age of 93.

In an unusual and strangely befitting tribute, the ashes of this well-known Italian coffee impresario were placed in a giant Moka pot at his funeral this week in Montebuglio, Italy.

Bialetti didn’t invent the Moka. He just made it famous. A man named Luigi di Ponti designed the appliance in 1933 and sold the patent to Renato’s father Alfonso Bialetti, an aluminum vendor.

Bialetti took the modest sales of his father’s company, which had only manufactured 70,000 pots when he gained control in 1947, and spearheaded a massive marketing campaign across Italy for the pots, which were branded with a mustachioed caricature.

L’omino con i baffi, the little man with a mustache, remains a widely-recognized symbol in Italy today.


Watch the video: Обзор Гейзерных Кофеварок Bialetti. Электрические и традиционные гейзерные кофеварки (January 2022).