Traditional recipes

Roy’s Restaurants Offer New Hawaiian-Inspired Dishes

Roy’s Restaurants Offer New Hawaiian-Inspired Dishes

The prix fixe menu celebrates Hawaii’s rich culinary culture

Roy’s Kona coffee-crusted pork with Kauai prawns.

Roy’s restaurants are offering a new Hawaiian-inspired prix fixe menu featuring three courses that highlight the islands’ signature ingredients.

Master chef Roy Yamaguchi partnered with local Roy’s chefs to create cocktails, appetizers, main courses, and desserts that pay tribute to the very best of Hawaii’s culinary culture.

Diners have a choice of two appetizers: an heirloom tomato salad with macadamia nut pesto and house-made ricotta; or the shrimp shumai with Chinese cabbage, Kalware sprouts, and pineapple shoyu vinaigrette. Main course options include a fresh daily fish that’s pan-seared with baby squash, shiso, tomato, and a Vadouvan carrot puree; and a Kona coffee-crusted pork with Kauai prawns in an Okinawan coconut purée with honshimeji mushrooms and bok choy.

Dessert choices comprise a white chocolate tart with basil seeds and a passion fruit sorbet, and a chocolate soufflé with a molten center and vanilla ice cream.

Mixoligists at Roy’s have created special Hawaiian Mai Tai and Hawaiian martini cocktails to accompany the menu.

The Creative Hawaii menu is part of Roy’s rotating prix fixe menus that change seasonally and are offered for $39.95. Roy’s is also offering a sweepstakes offering a trip for two to the Hawaii Food & Wine Festival for the winner — for more information visit their website.


5 Hawaiian Recipes From Roy Choi

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii.

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii𠅊s writer Jonathan Gold discovered when he took a marathon eating tour of Honolulu with Choi. It’s not just the beaches and the weather that brings Choi back year after year to Hawaii—it’s the food. Now, Choi will finally bring the authentic Hawaiian food he loves to Los Angeles at A-Frame.

Though the restaurant has been serving an interpretation of Hawaiian food for five years, the menu will become a full-fledged ode to “ono grindz” (Hawaiian slang for good food) this February. “Our new chef, Johnny Yoo, inspired me to look deeper into Hawaii and take it from the abstract to the real,” Choi writes on A-Frame’s website. Get a taste of some of the dishes that might appear on the menu with five of Choi’s takes on his favorite Hawaiian dishes.

Spam-and-Kimchi Musubi
“This is the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of Hawaii,” says Choi about the sushi-like musubi, a mix of seared Spam, sushi rice and pureed kimchi, all wrapped up in nori.

Asian Fried and Glazed Baby Back Ribs
One of Choi’s favorite Honolulu spots is Side Street Inn, partially because of the sticky fried ribs. He makes his version with a mix of Asian sauces, including hoisin, black bean sauce, oyster sauce and Sriracha.

Tomato-and-Pineapple Salad with Garlic Chips
Choi makes this tomato-and-onion salad as an homage to Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.

Oxtail Soup with Daikon and Ramen Noodles
Oxtail is a popular ingredient in Hawaiian cooking. Choi makes it the base for the broth of his hearty soup and adds plenty of the tender braised meat as well.

Chicken Teriyaki Plate
Choi’s excellent version of this classic dish has a surprise ingredient: lemon-lime soda.


5 Hawaiian Recipes From Roy Choi

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii.

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii𠅊s writer Jonathan Gold discovered when he took a marathon eating tour of Honolulu with Choi. It’s not just the beaches and the weather that brings Choi back year after year to Hawaii—it’s the food. Now, Choi will finally bring the authentic Hawaiian food he loves to Los Angeles at A-Frame.

Though the restaurant has been serving an interpretation of Hawaiian food for five years, the menu will become a full-fledged ode to “ono grindz” (Hawaiian slang for good food) this February. “Our new chef, Johnny Yoo, inspired me to look deeper into Hawaii and take it from the abstract to the real,” Choi writes on A-Frame’s website. Get a taste of some of the dishes that might appear on the menu with five of Choi’s takes on his favorite Hawaiian dishes.

Spam-and-Kimchi Musubi
“This is the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of Hawaii,” says Choi about the sushi-like musubi, a mix of seared Spam, sushi rice and pureed kimchi, all wrapped up in nori.

Asian Fried and Glazed Baby Back Ribs
One of Choi’s favorite Honolulu spots is Side Street Inn, partially because of the sticky fried ribs. He makes his version with a mix of Asian sauces, including hoisin, black bean sauce, oyster sauce and Sriracha.

Tomato-and-Pineapple Salad with Garlic Chips
Choi makes this tomato-and-onion salad as an homage to Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.

Oxtail Soup with Daikon and Ramen Noodles
Oxtail is a popular ingredient in Hawaiian cooking. Choi makes it the base for the broth of his hearty soup and adds plenty of the tender braised meat as well.

Chicken Teriyaki Plate
Choi’s excellent version of this classic dish has a surprise ingredient: lemon-lime soda.


5 Hawaiian Recipes From Roy Choi

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii.

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii𠅊s writer Jonathan Gold discovered when he took a marathon eating tour of Honolulu with Choi. It’s not just the beaches and the weather that brings Choi back year after year to Hawaii—it’s the food. Now, Choi will finally bring the authentic Hawaiian food he loves to Los Angeles at A-Frame.

Though the restaurant has been serving an interpretation of Hawaiian food for five years, the menu will become a full-fledged ode to “ono grindz” (Hawaiian slang for good food) this February. “Our new chef, Johnny Yoo, inspired me to look deeper into Hawaii and take it from the abstract to the real,” Choi writes on A-Frame’s website. Get a taste of some of the dishes that might appear on the menu with five of Choi’s takes on his favorite Hawaiian dishes.

Spam-and-Kimchi Musubi
“This is the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of Hawaii,” says Choi about the sushi-like musubi, a mix of seared Spam, sushi rice and pureed kimchi, all wrapped up in nori.

Asian Fried and Glazed Baby Back Ribs
One of Choi’s favorite Honolulu spots is Side Street Inn, partially because of the sticky fried ribs. He makes his version with a mix of Asian sauces, including hoisin, black bean sauce, oyster sauce and Sriracha.

Tomato-and-Pineapple Salad with Garlic Chips
Choi makes this tomato-and-onion salad as an homage to Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.

Oxtail Soup with Daikon and Ramen Noodles
Oxtail is a popular ingredient in Hawaiian cooking. Choi makes it the base for the broth of his hearty soup and adds plenty of the tender braised meat as well.

Chicken Teriyaki Plate
Choi’s excellent version of this classic dish has a surprise ingredient: lemon-lime soda.


5 Hawaiian Recipes From Roy Choi

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii.

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii𠅊s writer Jonathan Gold discovered when he took a marathon eating tour of Honolulu with Choi. It’s not just the beaches and the weather that brings Choi back year after year to Hawaii—it’s the food. Now, Choi will finally bring the authentic Hawaiian food he loves to Los Angeles at A-Frame.

Though the restaurant has been serving an interpretation of Hawaiian food for five years, the menu will become a full-fledged ode to “ono grindz” (Hawaiian slang for good food) this February. “Our new chef, Johnny Yoo, inspired me to look deeper into Hawaii and take it from the abstract to the real,” Choi writes on A-Frame’s website. Get a taste of some of the dishes that might appear on the menu with five of Choi’s takes on his favorite Hawaiian dishes.

Spam-and-Kimchi Musubi
“This is the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of Hawaii,” says Choi about the sushi-like musubi, a mix of seared Spam, sushi rice and pureed kimchi, all wrapped up in nori.

Asian Fried and Glazed Baby Back Ribs
One of Choi’s favorite Honolulu spots is Side Street Inn, partially because of the sticky fried ribs. He makes his version with a mix of Asian sauces, including hoisin, black bean sauce, oyster sauce and Sriracha.

Tomato-and-Pineapple Salad with Garlic Chips
Choi makes this tomato-and-onion salad as an homage to Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.

Oxtail Soup with Daikon and Ramen Noodles
Oxtail is a popular ingredient in Hawaiian cooking. Choi makes it the base for the broth of his hearty soup and adds plenty of the tender braised meat as well.

Chicken Teriyaki Plate
Choi’s excellent version of this classic dish has a surprise ingredient: lemon-lime soda.


5 Hawaiian Recipes From Roy Choi

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii.

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii𠅊s writer Jonathan Gold discovered when he took a marathon eating tour of Honolulu with Choi. It’s not just the beaches and the weather that brings Choi back year after year to Hawaii—it’s the food. Now, Choi will finally bring the authentic Hawaiian food he loves to Los Angeles at A-Frame.

Though the restaurant has been serving an interpretation of Hawaiian food for five years, the menu will become a full-fledged ode to “ono grindz” (Hawaiian slang for good food) this February. “Our new chef, Johnny Yoo, inspired me to look deeper into Hawaii and take it from the abstract to the real,” Choi writes on A-Frame’s website. Get a taste of some of the dishes that might appear on the menu with five of Choi’s takes on his favorite Hawaiian dishes.

Spam-and-Kimchi Musubi
“This is the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of Hawaii,” says Choi about the sushi-like musubi, a mix of seared Spam, sushi rice and pureed kimchi, all wrapped up in nori.

Asian Fried and Glazed Baby Back Ribs
One of Choi’s favorite Honolulu spots is Side Street Inn, partially because of the sticky fried ribs. He makes his version with a mix of Asian sauces, including hoisin, black bean sauce, oyster sauce and Sriracha.

Tomato-and-Pineapple Salad with Garlic Chips
Choi makes this tomato-and-onion salad as an homage to Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.

Oxtail Soup with Daikon and Ramen Noodles
Oxtail is a popular ingredient in Hawaiian cooking. Choi makes it the base for the broth of his hearty soup and adds plenty of the tender braised meat as well.

Chicken Teriyaki Plate
Choi’s excellent version of this classic dish has a surprise ingredient: lemon-lime soda.


5 Hawaiian Recipes From Roy Choi

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii.

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii𠅊s writer Jonathan Gold discovered when he took a marathon eating tour of Honolulu with Choi. It’s not just the beaches and the weather that brings Choi back year after year to Hawaii—it’s the food. Now, Choi will finally bring the authentic Hawaiian food he loves to Los Angeles at A-Frame.

Though the restaurant has been serving an interpretation of Hawaiian food for five years, the menu will become a full-fledged ode to “ono grindz” (Hawaiian slang for good food) this February. “Our new chef, Johnny Yoo, inspired me to look deeper into Hawaii and take it from the abstract to the real,” Choi writes on A-Frame’s website. Get a taste of some of the dishes that might appear on the menu with five of Choi’s takes on his favorite Hawaiian dishes.

Spam-and-Kimchi Musubi
“This is the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of Hawaii,” says Choi about the sushi-like musubi, a mix of seared Spam, sushi rice and pureed kimchi, all wrapped up in nori.

Asian Fried and Glazed Baby Back Ribs
One of Choi’s favorite Honolulu spots is Side Street Inn, partially because of the sticky fried ribs. He makes his version with a mix of Asian sauces, including hoisin, black bean sauce, oyster sauce and Sriracha.

Tomato-and-Pineapple Salad with Garlic Chips
Choi makes this tomato-and-onion salad as an homage to Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.

Oxtail Soup with Daikon and Ramen Noodles
Oxtail is a popular ingredient in Hawaiian cooking. Choi makes it the base for the broth of his hearty soup and adds plenty of the tender braised meat as well.

Chicken Teriyaki Plate
Choi’s excellent version of this classic dish has a surprise ingredient: lemon-lime soda.


5 Hawaiian Recipes From Roy Choi

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii.

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii𠅊s writer Jonathan Gold discovered when he took a marathon eating tour of Honolulu with Choi. It’s not just the beaches and the weather that brings Choi back year after year to Hawaii—it’s the food. Now, Choi will finally bring the authentic Hawaiian food he loves to Los Angeles at A-Frame.

Though the restaurant has been serving an interpretation of Hawaiian food for five years, the menu will become a full-fledged ode to “ono grindz” (Hawaiian slang for good food) this February. “Our new chef, Johnny Yoo, inspired me to look deeper into Hawaii and take it from the abstract to the real,” Choi writes on A-Frame’s website. Get a taste of some of the dishes that might appear on the menu with five of Choi’s takes on his favorite Hawaiian dishes.

Spam-and-Kimchi Musubi
“This is the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of Hawaii,” says Choi about the sushi-like musubi, a mix of seared Spam, sushi rice and pureed kimchi, all wrapped up in nori.

Asian Fried and Glazed Baby Back Ribs
One of Choi’s favorite Honolulu spots is Side Street Inn, partially because of the sticky fried ribs. He makes his version with a mix of Asian sauces, including hoisin, black bean sauce, oyster sauce and Sriracha.

Tomato-and-Pineapple Salad with Garlic Chips
Choi makes this tomato-and-onion salad as an homage to Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.

Oxtail Soup with Daikon and Ramen Noodles
Oxtail is a popular ingredient in Hawaiian cooking. Choi makes it the base for the broth of his hearty soup and adds plenty of the tender braised meat as well.

Chicken Teriyaki Plate
Choi’s excellent version of this classic dish has a surprise ingredient: lemon-lime soda.


5 Hawaiian Recipes From Roy Choi

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii.

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii𠅊s writer Jonathan Gold discovered when he took a marathon eating tour of Honolulu with Choi. It’s not just the beaches and the weather that brings Choi back year after year to Hawaii—it’s the food. Now, Choi will finally bring the authentic Hawaiian food he loves to Los Angeles at A-Frame.

Though the restaurant has been serving an interpretation of Hawaiian food for five years, the menu will become a full-fledged ode to “ono grindz” (Hawaiian slang for good food) this February. “Our new chef, Johnny Yoo, inspired me to look deeper into Hawaii and take it from the abstract to the real,” Choi writes on A-Frame’s website. Get a taste of some of the dishes that might appear on the menu with five of Choi’s takes on his favorite Hawaiian dishes.

Spam-and-Kimchi Musubi
“This is the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of Hawaii,” says Choi about the sushi-like musubi, a mix of seared Spam, sushi rice and pureed kimchi, all wrapped up in nori.

Asian Fried and Glazed Baby Back Ribs
One of Choi’s favorite Honolulu spots is Side Street Inn, partially because of the sticky fried ribs. He makes his version with a mix of Asian sauces, including hoisin, black bean sauce, oyster sauce and Sriracha.

Tomato-and-Pineapple Salad with Garlic Chips
Choi makes this tomato-and-onion salad as an homage to Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.

Oxtail Soup with Daikon and Ramen Noodles
Oxtail is a popular ingredient in Hawaiian cooking. Choi makes it the base for the broth of his hearty soup and adds plenty of the tender braised meat as well.

Chicken Teriyaki Plate
Choi’s excellent version of this classic dish has a surprise ingredient: lemon-lime soda.


5 Hawaiian Recipes From Roy Choi

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii.

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii𠅊s writer Jonathan Gold discovered when he took a marathon eating tour of Honolulu with Choi. It’s not just the beaches and the weather that brings Choi back year after year to Hawaii—it’s the food. Now, Choi will finally bring the authentic Hawaiian food he loves to Los Angeles at A-Frame.

Though the restaurant has been serving an interpretation of Hawaiian food for five years, the menu will become a full-fledged ode to “ono grindz” (Hawaiian slang for good food) this February. “Our new chef, Johnny Yoo, inspired me to look deeper into Hawaii and take it from the abstract to the real,” Choi writes on A-Frame’s website. Get a taste of some of the dishes that might appear on the menu with five of Choi’s takes on his favorite Hawaiian dishes.

Spam-and-Kimchi Musubi
“This is the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of Hawaii,” says Choi about the sushi-like musubi, a mix of seared Spam, sushi rice and pureed kimchi, all wrapped up in nori.

Asian Fried and Glazed Baby Back Ribs
One of Choi’s favorite Honolulu spots is Side Street Inn, partially because of the sticky fried ribs. He makes his version with a mix of Asian sauces, including hoisin, black bean sauce, oyster sauce and Sriracha.

Tomato-and-Pineapple Salad with Garlic Chips
Choi makes this tomato-and-onion salad as an homage to Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.

Oxtail Soup with Daikon and Ramen Noodles
Oxtail is a popular ingredient in Hawaiian cooking. Choi makes it the base for the broth of his hearty soup and adds plenty of the tender braised meat as well.

Chicken Teriyaki Plate
Choi’s excellent version of this classic dish has a surprise ingredient: lemon-lime soda.


5 Hawaiian Recipes From Roy Choi

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii.

Chef Roy Choi was born in Korea and raised in Los Angeles, but his heart is in Hawaii𠅊s writer Jonathan Gold discovered when he took a marathon eating tour of Honolulu with Choi. It’s not just the beaches and the weather that brings Choi back year after year to Hawaii—it’s the food. Now, Choi will finally bring the authentic Hawaiian food he loves to Los Angeles at A-Frame.

Though the restaurant has been serving an interpretation of Hawaiian food for five years, the menu will become a full-fledged ode to “ono grindz” (Hawaiian slang for good food) this February. “Our new chef, Johnny Yoo, inspired me to look deeper into Hawaii and take it from the abstract to the real,” Choi writes on A-Frame’s website. Get a taste of some of the dishes that might appear on the menu with five of Choi’s takes on his favorite Hawaiian dishes.

Spam-and-Kimchi Musubi
“This is the peanut butter and jelly sandwich of Hawaii,” says Choi about the sushi-like musubi, a mix of seared Spam, sushi rice and pureed kimchi, all wrapped up in nori.

Asian Fried and Glazed Baby Back Ribs
One of Choi’s favorite Honolulu spots is Side Street Inn, partially because of the sticky fried ribs. He makes his version with a mix of Asian sauces, including hoisin, black bean sauce, oyster sauce and Sriracha.

Tomato-and-Pineapple Salad with Garlic Chips
Choi makes this tomato-and-onion salad as an homage to Hawaiian fruits and vegetables.

Oxtail Soup with Daikon and Ramen Noodles
Oxtail is a popular ingredient in Hawaiian cooking. Choi makes it the base for the broth of his hearty soup and adds plenty of the tender braised meat as well.

Chicken Teriyaki Plate
Choi’s excellent version of this classic dish has a surprise ingredient: lemon-lime soda.


Watch the video: Roys: Ebi Sushi Roll (October 2021).