Traditional recipes

Marsala and Dried-Fig Crostata Recipe

Marsala and Dried-Fig Crostata Recipe

Ingredients

Filling

  • 1 1/4 pounds dried Calimyrna figs, stemmed, coarsely chopped
  • 1/4 cup (packed) golden brown sugar
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

Crust

  • 2 1/4 cups all purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup plus 6 tablespoons (1 3/4 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature

Recipe Preparation

Filling

  • Combine all ingredients in heavy large saucepan and bring to boil over high heat. Reduce heat to medium-low. Cover and simmer until figs are very tender, about 1 hour. Uncover and simmer until liquid reduces slightly, about 8 minutes. Transfer mixture to medium bowl. Cool slightly. Refrigerate until cool, stirring occasionally (mixture will be thick), about 45 minutes. Discard cinnamon sticks. DO AHEAD Filling can be made 1 day ahead. Cover and keep chilled.

Crust

  • Preheat oven to 375°F. Mix flour, sugar, fennel seeds, and salt in processor. Add butter and 1 egg. Using on/off turns, process until dough forms. Gather dough into ball; divide in half. Flatten each half into disk. Wrap 1 disk in plastic wrap; refrigerate until cold, at least 30 minutes and up to 1 day. Press remaining dough disk onto bottom and up sides of 10-inch-diameter tart pan with removable bottom. Pierce bottom all over with fork. Chill until firm, about 10 minutes. DO AHEAD Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Cover and keep chilled.

  • Roll out chilled dough disk on waxed paper to 12-inch round. Transfer dough on waxed paper to rimless baking sheet. Cut dough into twelve 3/4-inch-wide strips. Chill strips while filling tart. Spread filling evenly in crust. Place 6 dough strips atop filling, spacing evenly. Place remaining 6 strips diagonally atop first 6 strips, forming diamond lattice pattern. Press ends of strips against edge of tart pan to trim. Whisk remaining egg in small bowl to blend; brush over lattice.

  • Bake tart until juices bubble thickly around edges and crust is deep golden, about 55 minutes. Cool on rack 1 hour. Using small knife, gently loosen tart from pan sides. Remove sides. Serve slightly warm or at room temperature with ice cream.

Reviews Section

Fresh Fig Recipes to Make While This Luscious Fruit Is in Season

Fresh figs are a delicacy. Their richly-colored skin like velvet, luscious texture, and floral flavors are a world away from the concentrated chewiness of dried figs. A heaping platter of ripe figs, with a couple gently squeezed open, reminiscent of a Dutch still life, is one of the most beautiful things you can serve to friends around a supper table. Just add fruit knives and an excellent cheese.

Beyond the fruit bowl, fresh figs are versatile and surprising. They improve simple savory salads and snacks, and add complexity to easy or slow-cooked entrées. Their famous sweetness is a foil for tart vinegars and a natural for decadent desserts. Rich in potassium, Vitamins K and B6, they are a nutritious ingredient.

Pounce on ripe figs when you see them. Use them quickly they don't ripen at home. Look for smooth, plump specimens. Wrinkling or stickiness indicates over-ripeness. An under-ripe fig feels woody. Please don't squeeze: A light touch will tell you if it is ripe. Store figs for up to two days in the refrigerator, covered, in a single layer.

While we think of figs as fruit, they are actually edible flowers. They appear from midsummer, when the first, breba crop ripens on the tree. This smaller crop grows on the previous season's wood. The main crop is responsible for the flush of fruit at market in early fall. It forms later, on this season's new, green growth.

Read on for our favorite fresh fig recipes. They'll inspire your own delicious meals and desserts to come.


Honey Roasted Chicken and Figs

This Honey Roasted Chicken and Figs has onions, shallots and figs roasted in a garlic honey sauce that gets a little love from red wine vinegar. So good.

When roasted, figs slowly break down and turn into a custard like fruit that’s sweet in flavor and jam-like in texture. These get a little extra love from a garlic honey sauce that is savory and offset with some tang from red wine vinegar. Add to the dish the chicken and this Honey Roasted Chicken and Figs is a complete meal too good not to share. Doesn’t this one scream comfort food goodness and Autumn?

I made this several times with three different vinegars. First I tried rice wine and it was too sweet. Next up was with apple cider vinegar, and while I loved it, the red wine vinegar was the perfect acid to off set the sweetness of the figs and honey.

This Honey Roasted Chicken and Figs is a wonderful comfort food dinner without the carbs like a pasta dish or with mashed potatoes. Slow roasted chicken in an insanely delicious garlic honey sauce with sweet figs. Sound good? I swear to you it is indeed.

I like to use bone-in, skin on chicken thighs for this one. I feel the thighs have more flavor and I love the rendered and crispy chicken skin on top. Salt and peppered all over the chicken thighs get a pan sear, then in the same pan go the onions, shallots and garlic. A mixture of red wine vinegar, honey, red pepper flakes and cornstarch make the sauce.

Back in the pan with the sauce go the thighs and sliced figs to round it all out for a little roasting. What you have is one delicious Autumn dinner.

The flavor weapon here is definitely the red wine vinegar, but the fresh oregano is key as well.

The figs are so delicate and fork tender. Sweet, delicious and compliment the tangy garlic honey sauce. Take a look at this beauty!

I’ve made this as a one pan meal using my 12 inch cast iron, but feel free to use a large skillet able to go into the oven after the pan sear. Recently I doubled this recipe and after the pan sear roasted everything in my trusty 13࡯″ stone bakeware for a party. This one got rave reviews and everyone said to please post this recipe, so here it is people! We had a little Sweet and Sour Strawberry Semifreddo with Black Sesame (you MUST try this one, too!) as the dessert and it was a fantastic evening. Flavor explosion and textures is where it’s at, right? Who’s with me?

The sweet figs are incredible in this and the sweet and tangy sauce is fantastic, but if you like crispy chicken skin do not pour the sauce over or baste.


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Oatmeal Cookies with Dried Figs Recipe

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  • In a mixer, beat together the butter and brown sugar until well combined, about 1 minute
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  • From appetizers to desserts, there's a place for figs in every course of a meal
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Homemade No Bake Fig Newton Energy Bites

  • Place all ingredients in a large food processor and pulse until finely chopped, almost the consistency of sand

Fantastic Fig Recipes Cooking Light

  • View Recipe: Brandied Preserved Figs
  • This recipe will work with any fresh figs you have, such as Brown Turkey, Calimyrna, or Black Mission
  • Enjoy them as a simple dessert on their own, served with ice cream or yogurt, or as a salad topper
  • Store in a cool, dry place for up to 1 year

Lemon-Fig Cake Recipe Martha Stewart

  • Brush a 9-inch tart pan with a removable bottom (or a cake pan lined with parchment paper) with oil set aside

Fig Sauce Better Homes & Gardens

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  • Snip dried figs soak overnight in brandy
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53 dried figs recipes Indian Anjeer recipes

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Dried Figs with Ricotta, Walnuts & Honey

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  • Cut each fig in half crosswise, and place the fig pieces on a serving dish cut side up
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  • Fig-Hazelnut Cheesecake with Honey-Bourbon Drizzle If you're looking for a decadent dessert, this may be the one for you
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  • In a mixer, beat together the butter and brown sugar until well combined, about 1 minute
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  • Find healthy dried fig recipes & recipes with figs for baking, cheese plates, dinner, & more
  • You will find so many ways of how to cook figs.

Dried Fig, Honey and Spice Compote McCormick Gourmet

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  • Bring honey, water, lemon peel and spices to boil in medium saucepan
  • Add figs cover and simmer 7 minutes

Lemon-Fig Cake Recipe Martha Stewart

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Walnuts.org DA: 11 PA: 46 MOZ Rank: 71

  • Cut each fig in half crosswise, and place the fig pieces on a serving dish cut side up
  • Make a small indentation into the cut side of each fig half with a small spoon or your finger
  • Put a 1/4 teaspoon of the ricotta cheese onto each piece of fig and top with a walnut half
  • Drizzle each fig with honey and serve.

40 Must Make Gluten-Free Fig Recipes

  • Absolutely! You can use dried figs in any of the recipes where the moisture from the figs or the texture doesn't make a difference
  • For instance, I wouldn't advise using dried figs in a smoothie unless you have a super high-powered blender to blend the hardened skin, or in a dish like oatmeal where fresh figs

Marsala and Dried-Fig Crostata recipe Epicurious.com

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  • Combine all ingredients in heavy large saucepan and bring to boil over high heat
  • Cover and simmer until figs are very tender, …

Fresh Fig Recipes to Make While This Luscious Fruit Is in

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  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees
  • Line an 8࡮ inch baking pan with parchment paper, letting the excess drape over the sides

Fantastic Fig Recipes Cooking Light

  • View Recipe: Brandied Preserved Figs
  • This recipe will work with any fresh figs you have, such as Brown Turkey, Calimyrna, or Black Mission
  • Enjoy them as a simple dessert on their own, served with ice cream or yogurt, or as a salad topper
  • Store in a cool, dry place for up to 1 year

25 Dried fig recipes ideas fig recipes, recipes, dried

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  • Apr 27, 2020 - Explore Doris Kuhn's board "dried fig recipes" on Pinterest
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Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Tuscan Tempranillo and More, at Pietro Beconcini


San Miniato, a town on the left bank of the Arno River about 30 miles downstream of Florence, is not particularly known for its wine. Not that they don't grow grapes -- they do, and many farmers traditionally sold to nearby areas that are known for their wines -- but the wines they make never enjoyed much of a reputation.

This of course made is extremely difficult for those who did try to support themselves through winemaking, and while Leonardo Beconcini's father Pietro did manage to install a few cement tanks in the cellar under their house, he wasn't able to line them with glass -- that improvement was made by Leonardo, when he took over operations in the early 90s. Since then Leonardo has added a number of new tanks, all but two cement (he bought a pair of steel tanks one year when he was unable to find used cement tanks), which he keeps outside and uses during the winter months, bottling the wines they contain or transferring them to the cellar when it gets too hot out.

For that matter, Leonardo, whose only white is a Vinsanto, also makes do without computer-regulated refrigeration during fermentation: He keeps an eye on the temperatures in the vats, and if the fermenting wine gets too hot transfers it to a cooler tank outside, and then pumps it back over the cap. Temperature control is something he's like, but for now he makes do with what he has.

This frugality of necessity has also had a profound affect on the way he (and his father before him) managed their vineyards: Rather than periodically pull up the vines and replant them, as is generally done in Italy, Leonardo replaces the individual vines that die with cuttings from the best vines in the vineyard. Doing it this way allows him, on the one hand, to not loose production (and income) for the 3-5 years it takes a newly planted vineyard to begin producing, and, on the other, maintains balance in the vineyard, as most of the vines at any given time are mature, and some as much as 80-90 years old. This way of vineyard management has also led to some unusual surprises.

In particular, he had about 300 vines of a red varietal unlike any to be found in any of his neighbors' vineyards. It was quite particular, budding late and ripening early, and from an agronomic standpoint was actually better adapted to the region than Sangiovese, requiring less effort to cultivate as it was much more resistant to funguses and disease, and thus required fewer treatments -- something that is also important from an environmental standpoint. Moreover, it didn't want a tremendous amount of sun, but rather worked well in the lower parts of the hills.

When he tried microvinifying the grapes from the mystery vine separately the resulting wine was good enough that he decided to use it to make a single-varietal wine of it, rather than add it to the blend as they had always done previously. To make a single-varietal wine one must say what the grape is (to the authorities, especially), and this is where he ran into problems -- while the experts who came to look ruled out the various lesser Tuscan indigenous varietals, for example Foglia Tonda or Pugnitello, nobody was willing to hazard a guess as to what it was.

So Leonardo simply called it X, and continued studying it, propagating it through cuttings from the best vines. The answer finally came from Professor Attilio Scienza, who ran a DNA analysis on the mystery vine, and then called Leonardo to ask how it was that he had Tempranillo vines -- vines not exactly like the Tempranillo now grown in Spain, but clearly displaying the same DNA fingerprint -- in his vineyard.

While Tempranillo is very common in Spain, this was its first known occurrence in Italy, and to have it turn up in a very old and very traditionally managed vineyard rather than an experimental vineyard belonging to someone bent on trying new things was puzzling indeed.

The probable answer is a historical accident. San Miniato was one of the rest stops of the Via Francigena, the route pilgrims traveling overland followed to Rome from points to the north and to the west, and the land now belonging to Leonardo's family once belonged to the Bishopric of San Miniato, which was at one point one of the most important in Tuscany. Bishops of course had to manage their lands, and between 1730 and 1780 Leonardo's parish was home to Giovanbattista Landeschi, who was a cleric, but also a respected agronomist, and introduced many innovations among other things he had the farmers terrace overly steep lands. Don Landeschi was also interested in viticulture, and wrote about making vineyard selections to improve wine quality -- he didn't go so far as to name the vines he was selecting, but it stands to reason that given his interest in vines a pilgrim might have brought him some, a travel souvenir from a trip to Spain, as it were, and that, when he saw that they were good, he propagated them in the vineyards he managed directly.

As I said, Leonardo took advantage of the time he spent trying to identify "Vine X" to study it, and once he got it approved for cultivation used it to rationalize his vineyards. His land, as you can see from the photographs, gently slopes to the valley floor. In the traditional Tuscan manner it was planted primarily to Sangiovese, and he told me that the grapes (red and white) in the lower vineyards, where the soil is also quite clayey, with enough moisture that drought is never a problem -- further up slope there are also abundant of sea shells, scattered through the sediments and also in lenses -- almost never ripened completely, and also suffered from mildew and other problems to an extent that would make them unusable today.

Enter Tempranillo, which buds late, making it less susceptible to the frosts that can strike valley bottoms in the spring, and ripens early too: The cooler temperatures of the valley bottom slow its ripening some, allowing it to develop greater complexity while ripening fully, while its resistance to disease and mildew allow it to stand up to the moisture. So Leonardo has planted the areas unsuited to Tuscan varietals to Tempranillo. Sangiovese, Canaiolo and Malvasia Nera are in the central areas, and there are also two ridge crest plots planted to Sangiovese, for a total of about 12 hectares.

The Wines, Tasted January 12 2012:

Pietro Boconcini Maurleo IGT Toscana 2008
Lot 54/11
Pietro named this after his two sons, Maurizio and Leonardo. It's their base wine, a 50-50 Sangiovese and Malvasia Nera IGT that was originally planned as a Chianti Superiore, though the grapes available made this impossible. It is, instead, typical for San Miniato, and ages in 2, 3, 4, and 5-year old small oak. Deep cherry with black reflections and some almandine in the rim. The bouquet is fairly rich, with jammy cherry fruit laced with some wild berry fruit and slight graphite shavings hints iodine, and some spice. On the palate it's medium bodied, with bright cherry fruit supported by greenish vegetal accents and bright acidity shot with some licorice root, and by tannins that are fairly bright, and flow into a tart slightly vegetal finish. Pleasant in a fairly zesty key there is lively acidity and the oak balances it without muzzling it, providing a smooth round underpinning. A wine that will work well with grilled meats -- spare ribs, for example -- or stews, and also with hearty meat based pasta dishes -- sugo alla Bolognese for example.
1 stars

Pietro Boconcini Chianti Riserva 2009
Lot 336/11
These grapes are from old vines, and in the past Leonardo put them into Reciso, his Sangiovese in purezza. However, these vines are more productive, and he therefore siphoned them off into a new wine, allowing them to produce more. It's 85% Sangiovese, with a mix of Canaiolo and Malvasia Nera. They have always had some Canaiolo -- not a lot, but some, and he even has some Canaiolo rosa (which for now goes into his reds). It ages in large oak. Black cherry with black reflections and some almandine in the rim, which is brick. The bouquet is moderately rich, with cherry fruit laced with menthol and some brambly accents, and also some acidity to provide zest. Also hints wood smoke. On the palate it's medium bodied, with fairly bright cherry fruit supported by moderate acidity and tannins that are fairly smooth. Simple, and fairly direct, a food wine that will work well with what it's served with, not demanding attention, and go very fast.
2 stars

Pietro Boconcini Reciso IGT Toscana 2007
Lot 243/09
This was Leonardo's first wine, first vintage in 1995, and is from 6 small ridge-crest plots on two hilltops. Very steep slopes, and quite different exposures. 4 weeks maceration, more or less. -- it depends upon the quality of the skins. This vintage was aged in barriques and tonneaux (66/33, about 18 months) he now has added 10 hl botti to the mix. Deep black cherry with cherry rim. The bouquet is fairly intense, with cherry fruit supported by slight menthol, and some graphite shavings with spice and slight bramble, also some sweetness from alcohol -- it's 14.5% . Nice harmony, and the alcohol is not apparent as such. On the palate it's medium bodied, with full cherry fruit laced with nutmeg spice, and supported by minerality and savory notes, quite mineral, and by tannins that have a warm mineral burr and flow into a clean fairly long mineral finish. Quite pleasant in a rather austere key it's far from a fruit bomb and as such more particular than some. If you like the style you will enjoy it considerably, but you have to like the style. Nice aging potential too.
88-90

Their land is marine sediments, with quite a bit of salt, and also an abundance of fossil shells that release carbonates into the soil.

Pietro Boconcini IXE 2008 IGT
Lot 11/11
Ixe (pronounced eexeh) is the Italian pronunciation of the letter X this is Leonardo's lesser Tempranillo-based wine, made from the roughly 4.5 hectares of Tempranillo he planted between 1997 and 2005. It's about 4.5 ha in all. Here he allows the vines considerable liberty -- they're planted to 6,500 vines ha, and the production of the individual vines depends upon the number of buds. He green harvested through the 5th vintage, but once they reached equilibrium cut back, saying, "it's a very precocious varietal, and reducing the bunch load would lead to overly early ripening. The goal is a simple wine production is a bit less than 2 k per vine, 130 quintals per hectare. It ages in small oak, all old, and about 30% American oak, which Leonardo uses because American oak oxygenates more, and this counters Tempranillo's tendency to go into reduction. Deep black cherry, close to poured ink. The bouquet is bright, with sour cherry fruit laced with chopped tomato acidity, and savory notes, also some underbrush and bramble, and some wood smoke too, with underlying vegetal notes. On the palate it's medium bodied, with bright rather balsamic fruit -- it's quite distinct from Sangiovese -- supported by warmth and spice, and by tannins that are warm and balsamic and flow into a clean savory finish,. Also some mint on palate and nose. It's interesting, quite pleasant, and also quite obviously not Sangiovese, though just as obviously not one of the popular French varietals if someone were to hand it to me and say "where's it from?" I might have guessed Calabria. Very fresh -- one wouldn't guess it's 14.5% alcohol -- and will work well with foods, especially grilled meats.
2 stars

Pietro Boconcini Vigna Alle Nicchie IGT Toscana 2007
(Forgot to note the lot number)
This is from the historic vineyard, with the old vines that Leonardo started with, and a small parcel he planted on a ridge crest in 1998 -- a trial, which he is using for this wine. The grapes from the ridge crest are harvested early, and allowed to dry for 4 weeks prior to vinification. His aim is to make a Tempranillo with aging capacity, and to do this he needed ripe grapes. However, ripe grapes are low in acidity, so he harvests some earlier to have the acidity, and then works with the rest, allowing them to ripen. In the end it works it out. The wine is deep pigeon blood ruby with cherry rim. The bouquet is powerful, with rich cherry fruit laced with berry fruit jam, some menthol, slight underbrush, and some cumin seed. Interesting, and again clearly distinct from Sangiovese. On the palate it's full, and quite smooth, with elegant balsamic cherry plum fruit supported by savory accents and balsam-laced tannins with some cedar, and as the other elements fade lasting balsamic warmth. Interesting, and enjoyable, powerful and charged too, and because of its sweetness, which is in part alcohol -- 15.5 % -- it will work better with stews or succulent not too fatty roasts than grilled meats. It's reminiscent in some ways of an Amarone type wine, though the drying cycle is much faster. In terms of accompaniments, one might go with peposo, sweet-and-pungent hare (or boar), and other savory dishes with chocolate.
Particular, and though it won't work everywhere it will be perfect in the proper setting.
2 stars

Pietro Boconcini Caratello Vin Santo del Chianti 2001
This is quite traditional, with some Malvasia Nera -- the percentage varies with the vintage, up to 30%. Leonardo generally dries the grapes until February, though this year (2011) it was dry enough that he pressed them at the end of December. The wine ages at least 5 years in a mix of oak and chestnut casks. Leonardo has also begun making an Occhio di Pernice (Vinsanto from red grapes), but won't release it until 2014. This wine is tawny amber with greenish brown accents on the rim and some apricot reflections too. The bouquet is smoky, with considerable walnut skin and some nutmeats, and also quite a bit of sea salt and toasted almonds, and slight brown sugar. None of the oatmeal that sometimes emerges from Vinsanto. Slight dried fig, however. On the palate it's sweet, with the sweetness balanced by considerable savory notes, and by a tremendous wash of walnut supported by some savory accents, flowing into a walnut and toasted almond finish that lasts and lasts. Nuts in a glass, and quite pleasant, and as the nuts fade maple sugar sweetness emerges -- something I hadn't noted in a vinsanto before, but find quite nice.
88-90


Tiramisu

This recipe from Gian-Tony’s on the Hill.

Makes: 16 servings

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons instant espresso coffee powder
  • 1 tablespoon amaretto liqueur
  • 1 tablespoon hazelnut liqueur
  • 2 -8 ounce cartons mascarpone cheese
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 1/2 cups whipping cream
  • 3 tablespoons sugar
  • 3 tablespoons dried egg white powder
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 2 3 – ounce packages ladyfingers, split
  • 2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

For syrup: In a small saucepan, combine the 1/2 cup sugar, the 1/2 cup water and coffee powder. Cook over medium heat until boiling. Boil gently, uncovered, for 1 minute. Remove from heat stir in amaretto and hazelnut liqueur. Cool.

For filling: In a medium bowl, stir together mascarpone cheese, the 1/4 cup sugar and vanilla. In a chilled medium mixing bowl, combine whipping cream and the 3 tablespoons sugar. Beat with chilled beaters in an electric mixer on medium speed until soft peaks form. Fold 1/2 cup of the beaten whipped cream mixture into the mascarpone mixture to lighten set both mixtures aside. In another medium mixing bowl, beat dried egg whites and 1/2 cup water to stiff peaks according to package directions, adding the 1/3 cup granulated sugar, 1 tablespoon at a time, while beating.

To assemble: Arrange half of the ladyfinger halves in the bottom of a 9x9x2-inch baking pan. Brush with half of the syrup mixture. Spread with half of the mascarpone mixture, half of the whipped cream and half of the egg white mixture. Sprinkle with half of the cocoa powder. Arrange the remaining ladyfingers on top of the layers in the pan. Brush with the remaining syrup mixture. Spread with the remaining mascarpone mixture, the remaining whipped cream and the remaining egg white mixture. Sprinkle with the remaining cocoa powder. Cover and chill 4 to 24 hours before serving. Makes 16 servings.


Watch the video: Caramelised Figs with Balsamic Vinegar, Rosemary and Ricotta. Gordon Ramsay (January 2022).